Scleral Contact Lenses

Many people today prefer contacts over eyeglasses because they provide a natural appearance. Also, many people can see better with contact lenses because their vision isn't obstructed by an eyeglass frame or dirty lenses. Finally, many athletes prefer contacts over sports goggles because goggles can be bulky and less convenient than contacts.

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Many people can wear conventional soft lenses. However, if you have a condition that makes it hard to fit you for contacts, you will need a specialty lens, such as scleral lenses, which the professionals at Optikos Optometry can provide. 

What Are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses differ from all other lenses. Most lenses sit directly on the cornea and provide clear vision. Scleral lenses rest on the white of the eye, known as the sclera, and the part of the lens with the prescription vaults over the cornea without touching it. In addition, there is a reservoir of saline between the back surface of the lens and the front of the cornea, ensuring your eyes remain lubricated.

Types of Scleral Lenses

There are three types of scleral lenses, and they each have a different size and more or less contact with the cornea.

  • Corneoscleral and semi-scleral lenses: These lenses are considerably larger than gas permeable lenses and rest in the area between the sclera and the cornea.
  • Mini-scleral lenses: These lenses rest on the anterior part of the sclera and vault over the entire corneal surface.
  • Full scleral lenses: These are the largest scleral lenses in size and provide the most space between the back surface of the lens and the cornea.

Conditions Treated

Various eye conditions make it hard to fit for contacts, and you will need a special lens. There are several types of hard-to-fit contacts, and certain conditions require scleral lenses.

Keratoconus

This condition occurs when your cornea is too thin to hold its natural round shape. The cornea will bulge into a cone shape when this happens, making it impossible to wear soft lenses. Scleral lenses don't rest on the cornea; therefore, these lenses can correct your vision despite the abnormal shape of your cornea.

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis

This condition is an inflammatory reaction that occurs under the eyelids when proteins are secreted in your tears, often due to wearing soft contact lenses. You can also develop this condition if you use soft lenses and have allergies, hay fever, or asthma. Scleral contacts vault over the eye, preventing any protein buildup from affecting your eyes, which is the leading cause of giant papillary conjunctivitis.

Dry Eye Syndrome

This condition occurs when your eyes don't produce enough tears to keep your eyes lubricated. Soft contacts absorb the moisture in your eyes like a sponge, and soft contacts will dry your eyes, making the dry eye symptoms worse. Scleral lenses don't fit directly on the cornea, and there the saline reservoir at the bottom of the lens will keep your eyes lubricated all day.

Schedule an Appointment with Our Optometry Professionals in Los Angeles

If you have a condition that makes wearing soft lenses uncomfortable or impossible, call Optikos Optometry. We treat patients in Central LA and can fit you with scleral lenses. We can also perform your routine eye exams and provide you with prescription eyeglasses. If you don't have glasses to wear, you offer same-day glasses. Call us today at (213) 386-0001 for more information or to schedule an appointment with our eye doctor. 

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Monday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Location

Corner of Wilshire and Serrano